Artist to Watch

WXPN Radio

The premier guide for new and significant artists in rock, blues, and folk - including NPR-syndicated World Cafe ®

For online support visit the Listen Live page.

XPN2 - XPoNential Radio

24/7 Musical discovery. A unique mix of emerging and heritage blues, rock, world, folk, and alt-country artists.

For online support visit the Listen Live page.

World Cafe Archives

Join David Dye as he navigates the World Cafe through performances and interviews with celebrated and emerging artists.

Folk Alley

Folk music radio streaming on the web; Americana, Roots Music, recordings, and stories from folk's best.

For online support visit the Listen Live page.
Listen Live

The original neighborhood of Philadelphia, Old City, started as a thriving waterfront district. In the 1970s it was discovered by artists who moved their studios into former industrial and warehouse buildings. In the 80s and 90s the transition was completed with an influx of art galleries, design firms, architects and performance groups. All of which led to the creation of the Old City Arts Association and its first ever First Friday in 1991.

For fans of the Philadelphia band Man Man, On Oni Pond, the band's fifth studio album capitalizes on so much of what you love. The band's energy is contagious, the songs brilliantly bizarre, and despite a love for experimentation this collection is easily the band's most accessible to date. Yes, On Oni Pond is more focused but it's no less fun and certainly no less interesting. In fact, it's arguably the band's most intriguing album.

A jewel of Southern music, Randall Bramblett shines on his latest release, The Bright Spots, due out May 14 on New West Records.

A jewel of Southern music, Randall Bramblett shines on his latest release, The Bright Spots, due out May 14 on New West Records. Fresh off the inclusion of one of his songs on Bonnie Raitt's Grammy-winning album Slipstream, he has put together a masterful recording soaked with the soulful feel that has defined his music and that of his Southern contemporaries like Gregg Allman and Warren Haynes. From Howlin' Wolf to Ray Charles and "dark Motown" influences, sitar samples, gospel strains and even a snippet of watersplashing pygmies, The Bright Spots mixes diverse elements that dovetail into Randall's finest album yet.

Perhaps that's because the songs come from the experiences accumulated during his extensive career, starting in the '70s as a member of the jazzy Southern band Sea Level. Add to that a far-reaching resume of work with artists such as Steve Winwood (for 16 years), Gregg Allman, Chuck Leavell, Levon Helm, Widespread Panic, and Gov't Mule, and the touchstones of Randall's music emerge. "All these songs came from my life, just feeling that I'm getting a little older and trying to squeeze out a little more time or creativity before it's too late."

Randall Bramblett also plays Sellersville Theater that evening – Fri Sept 13

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.


Website | Facebook

Recent Release: The Bright Spots
Release Date: May 14, 2013
Label: 101 Distribution ADA

Made possible by support from XPN Members, and Comcast.

It's not every day you can see a 16-hour musical based on a telephone conversation or Norwegian actors emoting in fake Chinese or Yale trained musicians playing a desk. If you like your theater with an edge, if you prize innovation in dance and music, if you enjoy the unexpected onstage or at an out-of-the ordinary performance site, then FringeArts is for you.
You may not know that among the venerable cultural landmarks in Philadelphia the Walnut Street Theatre is historic. It's the oldest theater in the nation and celebrated its second century of continuous operation in 2009. The building at 9th and Walnut Streets is on the register of National Historic Landmarks.

The Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford has long been known as the home of works by three generations of Wyeths - magazine and book illustrator N.C. Wyeth, whom Outing Magazine called "one of our greatest, if not our greatest, painter of American outdoor life" in 1907, his son Andrew Wyeth,

Ernesto Lechner talks about his favorite singer, Joe Arroyo, an influential Columbian musician. He began singing at the age of 10 in the whorehouses of Cartagena. He was discovered by Fruko when he was a teenager and joined Fruko's band, Fruko Y Sus Tesos. In the 1980s, Arroyo pursued a solo career. He established a unique tropical sound called "Joeson" ("Joe's sound") that mixes salsa, calypso, zouk, compas, meringue, cumbia, and Columbian folklore.

This installment is an encore presentation of Latin Roots #15 of World Cafe's Latin Roots music series is hosted by Chicago-based journalist Catalina Maria Johnson. She writes in Spanish and English for publications such as HOY, Revista Contratiempo, Gozamos and Nat Geo Music. and is a regular radio personality and hosts/producer for the radio program Beat Latino, which airs in Chicago, Mexico City and Berlin.

In the late 19th century, Rumba started to emerge in the port city of Matanzas, an hour east of Havana. Rumba is more than just a style of music. It is a unique cultural blend of ryhtym, dance, and poetry. Cuban rumba begins with a chant upon which different elements are added. It is an important part of Afro-Cuban culture, and in its earliest forms served as a form of personal entertainment - the style was played in backyards or on the streets with family and friends - and often times an outlet for protest. The music is held together by a clave beat and melds congolese drumming with traditional call-and-response in either flamenco or Moorish styles. Cuban Rumba laid the foundation for many other distinct styles of Latin music and informs modern Latin hip-hop and salsa. Las Krudas are an Austin-based hip-hop act that incorporate many cuban rumba elements.

Coming off one of the most successful albums of her career, Neko Case reflects on the past four years with her new release The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You. Unfortunately the years between albums were spent dealing with the loss of family members and the grief that unavoidably followed. As a result, this new album is perhaps her most personal record to date. But as you'll hear, Case's strong-willed persona maintains as does her signature storytelling and dazzling vocals.

San Antonio native Alejandro Escovedo is the co-host of this sixteenth installment of Latin Roots, here to discuss the Latin character of his hometown's music in the 1950's. Escovedo's music has a strong Latin influence as a result of growing up in San Antoinio and listening to his parent's music. His Dad played mariachi, and his parents also to rancheras, country, and big band music - which all seeped into what he does today.

Page 70 of 158

Your Amazon Purchases Support WXPN