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While The Spinto Band has been making music for over 15 years, Cheers Elephant will have to play the role of new-comer this week. With that said the band’s third album Like Wind Blows Fire does a lot to impress. In many ways the new album does much to prove the band’s identity. Bright, summery tunes showered with melodic guitar riffs and catchy sing-a-long harmonies. The album starts with the tempting falsetto driven “Peoples” and follows with the album stand-out “Doin’ It, Right.” And as you work your way through these songs, more and more it’s clear that this is a band that’s realizing their potential with each note.

Since the announcement of Little Broken Hearts, the new studio album from Norah Jones, lots of critics have alluded to a change in direction. Initially, that was due in part to her collaboration with producer Brian Burton (aka Danger Mouse) whose tactics behind the board have been well documented with bands like The Black Keys, Beck, Broken Bells and Gnarls Barkley. But it would be somewhat misleading to say a sonic shift wasn’t something we saw coming with Norah’s last few projects. In fact, she worked previously with Burton as part of his Rome project with Daniele Luppi. So what is it about this new collection that sets it apart from Jones’ previous works? Well, quite simply, it’s the subject of the songs.

For an artist that’s been as prolific as Jack White, it's hard to believe that Blunderbuss is the first full solo album from the former White Stripes frontman. From his time with the Stripes, The Raconteurs, the Dead Weather, to producing for the likes of Loretta Lynn & Wanda Jackson and even starting his own record label White has been somewhat of a musical chameleon. No matter what shade of Jack White most appeals to you, Blunderbuss can likely scratch that itch. Much like White's career this collection is full of sonic twists and turns that only prove to engage with each listen.

Honestly, what’s not to like about JD McPherson? The teacher turned rocker dials up a sound reminiscent of rock and roll’s early days on Signs & Signifiers, his first album. His style and attitude are both representative of those times, but noticeably his influences run the gamut from rockabilly to soul, from punk to hip-hop. It’s that combination of appreciation and living in present that makes Signs & Signifiers an absolute gem.

Simply stated, Slipstream is an album that stands as a welcomed return from Bonnie Raitt. Fans have been longing for a new album since 2005’s Souls Alike. And while Slipstream is definitely a reconnection to a cherished voice and heritage artist, there is some new territory covered on this collection. Most notably, Raitt collaborates for the first time with producer Joe Henry. And Slipstream also marks the first album Raitt has released on her own record label (Redwing Records).

We first met the Alabama Shakes this fall when the young band from Athens, Alabama released their first EP. Four songs rarely ignite a career as much as they’ve done for the Alabama Shakes. Fresh out of high school, the soulful rockers have been aggressively touring, impressing show-goers and gearing up for the release of their debut, full length album, Boys & Girls, due out this month on ATO Records. Led by dynamic frontwoman Brittany Howard, the Shakes deliver on their potential with Boys & Girls for one of the year’s most exciting debuts.

Mac is back! Well, to be fair, it’s not like Dr. John hasn’t been consistent in his musical output. He’s released more than a handful of albums since the turn of century. But with Locked Down, his latest, perhaps none of those recent releases matches this latest collection in terms of energy and/or sheer appeal. Many will argue that a five time Grammy winner and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer has the latitude to do just about whatever they want, but for Dr. John Locked Down is an album he needed to make and music fans need to hear.

On his new album Justin Townes Earle aims to prove a few things, including the fact that it’s ok if the title of your album is longer than the actual runtime of the record. Alright, joke’s aside Nothing’s Gonna Change the Way You Feel About Me Now may be one of the more verbose album title’s we’ve seen in quite a while, but that hardly reflects the concise nature of the songs it headlines. Ten songs clocking in just over thirty minutes, Nothing’s Gonna Change… is one of Justin’s finest works to date harnessing his strength as a captivating storyteller.

Port of Morrow may be the first new album from The Shins in nearly half a decade, but those five years were far from your typical hiatus. The new album may better serve as a reintroduction and/or reincarnation of frontman James Mercer, rather than a continuation of what we’ve come to know from the band itself. The primary reason is that since 2007’s Wincing the Night Away, the entire band with the exception of Mercer has been replaced. Port of Morrow is also the first album from The Shins to not be released on the Sub Pop label. Mercer is releasing the collection on his own label Aural Apothecary (distributed by Columbia). And perhaps most notably Mercer seems to have confidently taken the reigns with a distinct vision and sonic direction for the band.

For Bruce Springsteen, an artist of true iconic stature and fame, you sometimes wonder where the motivation comes from. He’ll sell records as long as he keeps making them and fill seats as long as he keeps playing in front of them. For ‘The Boss’ life doesn’t seem too shabby. However listening to his new album Wrecking Ball, Bruce seems anything but content. For Springsteen making records at this point is hardly about moving up Billboard charts or filling stadiums, it’s about marking a moment in time. Wrecking Ball speaks to our hardships, our challenges and the eventual hope that lies ahead.

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